Olympia Today

OLYMPIA today

Since the mid-1990s, over $10 million has been invested in Flagship Olympia to keep her stable and open to the public.

Olympia retains over 75 percent of her original materials, including steel, wood, glass and machinery still in working order after over a century. Olympia's signal bridge and pilot house have been restored and rebuilt using plans original to her period of service. She continues to be part of technological advances with the unique application of ceramic epoxy to her hull using a cofferdam method along her wind and waterline.

But much more is needed to restore Flagship Olympia to her full potential and glory. 

Over the next several years, Olympia will undergo a magnificent transformation. Following the necessary dredging of the Delaware River, she will be towed to a dry dock where urgent hull repair will commence. Then, we will complete restoration of the ship’s hull, decks, engine rooms, living quarters, galleys, and many other storied spaces. We will bring her back to her full glory with operational systems on display in real time, including engines, electrical equipment, guns, communications systems, coaling, and cooking. Sections of the ship currently inaccessible to the public will be opened, utilizing the very best of 21st century interactive exhibit technology.

Flagship Olympia has much to tell us about our national heritage and ourselves. It is critical that she not only be preserved as the important national landmark that she is, but that she be presented in a way that engages the contemporary visitor with her full importance. 

To learn more about how you can be part of the Campaign for Flagship Olympia, contact us today.

Pilot house rebuilt to 1911 specifications
Pilot house rebuilt to 1911 specifications
Officers' quarters
Officers' quarters
Admiral's and Captain's quarters
Admiral's and Captain's quarters
Port side guns in Admiral's cabin
Port side guns
Two of OLYMPIA's six boilers
Two of OLYMPIA's six boilers